Graham Sutherland

 

Graham Vivian Sutherland was a British painter best known for his Surrealist abstractions of landscapes and figures. Over the course of his career, Sutherland’s aesthetic evolved from a more precise realism to focus on disturbing, thorn-shaped caricatures of the world.   Born on August 24, 1903 in London, United Kingdom, Sutherland went on to study art at Goldsmiths College in London in 1921, where he specialized in engraving. He was particularly inspired by the Romanticist painter Samuel Palmer, along with Paul Nash and Pablo Picasso.

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Printmaking, mostly of romantic landscapes, dominated Sutherland's work during the 1920s. He developed his art by working in watercolours before switching to using oil paints in the 1940s. It is these oil paintings, often of surreal, organic landscapes of the Pembrokeshire coast, that secured his reputation as a leading British modern artist. Sutherland taught at a number of art colleges, notably at Chelsea School of Art and at Goldsmiths College, where he had been a student. He served as an official war artist in the Second World War drawing industrial scenes on the British home front.

Today, his works are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C, the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, and the Dallas Museum of Art, among others. Sutherland died on February 17, 1980 in Kent, United Kingdom.

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